Weight Loss Information logo

Weight Loss Guidelines For Adults
Evaluation and Treatment of Overweight and Obesity in Adults
Weight Loss Information


Advice on Healthy Weight Management

Weight Loss Guidelines

National Institutes of Health
Expert Panel on the Identification, Evaluation, and Treatment of Overweight and Obesity in Adults

Short Articles About Weight and Health
Anorexia - Bulimia & Binge Eating - Cholesterol Advice - Diet for Cancer - Diet for Heart
Underweight Risks - Waist Hip Ratio - Weight Cycling - Weight & Lifespan - Weight Related Risks
Weight Risk Assessment - Does Body Fat Affect Health - Metabolic Syndrome X
Metabolic Syndrome - Health Effects of Weight Loss - Benefits of Weight Loss
Obesity and Surgical Operations - Why is an Apple Shape Unhealthy? - Obesity and Heart Risk
Health Dangers of Obesity for Children - Obesity & Colon Cancer - Body Fat & Cancer
Fat Reduction & Breast Cancer - Obesity and Immune Function - Weight Loss & Mortality
Weight Loss & Obstructive Sleep Apnea - Gallstones Formation in Obese - Hyperthyroidism & Weight
Gallstones & Weight Loss - GI and Obesity - Health, Weight & Obesity - Night Eating Syndrome

Strategies for the treatment of obesity and obesity related disease includes the following:

  • Weight loss to lower elevated blood pressure in overweight and obese persons with high blood pressure.
  • Weight loss to lower elevated levels of total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, and triglycerides, and to raise low levels of HDL-cholesterol in overweight and obese persons with dyslipidemia.
  • Weight loss to lower elevated blood glucose levels in overweight and obese persons with type 2 diabetes.
  • Use the Body Mass Index (BMI) to assess overweight and obesity. Body weight alone can be used to follow weight loss, and to determine the effectiveness of therapy.
  • Use the BMI to classify overweight and obesity and to estimate relative risk of disease compared to normal weight.
  • The waist circumference should be used to assess abdominal fat content.
  • The initial goal of weight loss therapy should be to reduce body weight by about 10 percent from baseline. With success, and if warranted, further weight loss can be attempted.
  • Weight loss should be about 1 to 2 pounds per week for a period of 6 months, with the subsequent strategy based on the amount of weight lost.
  • Low calorie diets (LCD) for weight loss in overweight and obese persons. Reducing fat as part of an LCD is a practical way to reduce calories.
  • Reducing dietary fat alone without reducing calories is not sufficient for weight loss. However, reducing dietary fat, along with reducing dietary carbohydrates, can help reduce calories.
  • A weight loss diet that is individually planned to help create a deficit of 500 to 1,000 kcal/day should be an intregal part of any program aimed at achieving a weight loss of 1 to 2 pounds per week.
  • Physical activity should be part of a comprehensive weight loss therapy and weight control program because it: (1) modestly contributes to weight loss in overweight and obese adults, (2) may decrease abdominal fat, (3) increases cardio-respiratory fitness, and (4) may help with maintenance of weight loss.
  • Physical activity should be an integral part of weight loss therapy and weight maintenance. Initially, moderate levels of physical activity for 30 to 45 minutes, 3 to 5 days a week, should be encouraged. All adults should set a long-term goal to accumulate at least 30 minutes or more of moderate-intensity physical activity on most, and preferably all, days of the week.
  • The combination of a reduced calorie diet and increased physical activity is recommended since it produces weight loss that may also result in decreases in abdominal fat and increases in cardiorespiratory fitness.
  • Behavior therapy is a useful adjunct when incorporated into treatment for weight loss and weight maintenance.
  • Weight loss and weight maintenance therapy should employ the combination of LCD's, increased physical activity, and behavior therapy.
  • After successful weight loss, the likelihood of weight loss maintenance is enhanced by a program consisting of dietary therapy, physical activity, and behavior therapy which should be continued indefinitely. Drug therapy can also be used. However, drug safety and efficacy beyond 1 year of total treatment have not been established.
  • A weight maintenance program should be a priority after the initial 6 months of weight loss therapy.

Weight loss information - Rapid Weight Loss - Diet Program - How to Lose Weight - Best Weight Loss Goals
Weight Loss Advice - Healthy Balanced Diet - Body Fat Percentage - Diets & Weight Loss Programs
Information on Weight Loss Diets - How to Reduce Weight - Weight Management - Weight Loss Surgery Information
Surgery Benefits/Risks - Weight Loss Drugs Advice - Weight Loss Pills / Weight Loss Pills Information
Xenical Weight Loss Drugs - Meridia/Sibutramine Pills - Guide to Diet Pills - Calorie Needs - Weight Loss Supplements
How to Control Weight - Body Mass Index Calculator - Exercise & Fitness to Lose Weight - Weight Health Issues - Obesity
Treatment of Obesity - Advice About Weight Loss - Questions on Weight Loss & Diet - Weight Loss Advice for Women
Weight Loss Advice for Diabetics - Weight Loss Advice for Teenagers - Weight Loss Advice for Adolescents
Diet & Weight Information - Weight Loss Support - Obesity Drug Treatment - Obesity & Gallstones - How to Lower Cholesterol
Dietary Guidelines - Protein, Carbs & Diet - Carbohydrates & Weight Loss - Weight Gain at College
Weight Gain After Quit Smoking - Weight Control in Menopause - Weight Gain in Pregnancy - Weight Control in Pregnancy
Weight Loss Breast-Feeding - Healthy Weight Range - Healthy Weight Loss Diet - Waist Circumference - Weight Cycling
Weight Health Risks - Weight Risks Assessment - Weight Reduction Tips - Weight Loss Guidelines - Weight Loss Products
Weight Loss Tools - Weight Maintenance

Enquiries: Contact Us. See also Terms of Use
© 2003-2017 Weight Loss Information. All Rights Reserved.